How did London civilians respond to the German airship raids of 1915?
Home Introduction Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4
Conclusion Acknowledgements Bibliography
Acknowledgements
My utmost thanks go to the staff at the British Library Newspapers, Colindale, who have spent endless time collecting many newspapers for me and helping with any queries relating to them.

This thanks must also be extended to include the staff at The National Archives, Kew, the Department of Documents at the Imperial War Museum, Lambeth, and the British Library, Pancras, who have also helped by providing me with numerous works which have been essential to this dissertation.

Additional thanks should also be given to my tutor, Anthony Gorst, who has spent much time answering endless emails and queries, reading drafts, and assisting with the final presentation of this dissertation.
Finally, I would also like to give acknowledgement to the people who recorded in letters, diaries, and later reminiscences, the experiences they endured during the airship raids on London.

Whilst newspapers have contributed significantly to the majority of this dissertation, these personal records have allowed it to be written to a much greater depth. Although some of the above have been more vital than others, they have all left an equally fascinating legacy from which it has been a great pleasure to draw.
‘… the little island in the silver seas was at the end of its immunity…’
H. G. Wells, The War in the Air (Middlesex, 1973), p. 140.
Zeppelin 1915 Attacking a Zeppelin

Zeppelins are capable of carrying, in addition to their crews, bombs weighing in the aggregate about a ton and a half. The chief menace to a Zeppelin is attack by aeroplanes, which are much swifter and capable of rising much higher. They can circle around a Zeppelin and drop bombs on it. So Zeppelins are frequently mounted with guns of high-angle range to repel attacking aeroplanes. To discharge a gun is fraught with danger to the Zeppelin, but that danger must be faced.

J. A. Hammerton (ed.) The War Illustrated: A Pictorial Record of the Conflict of Nations, Volume 1, (London, 1915) p. 493.
The forward gondola

Forward gondola of a Zeppelin, placed under the keel at the end of the great dirigible. The crew and engines are accommodated in two of these long, gondola-shaped cars.

J. A. Hammerton (ed.) The War Illustrated: A Pictorial Record of the Conflict of Nations, Volume 4, (London, 1916) p. 45.
Zeppelin Gondola 1915
How did London civilians respond to the German airship raids of 1915? Comments on this website to adrienne_barthram@hotmail.com

All material copyright © Adrienne Barthram. All rights are reserved. No part of any material on this web site may be reproduced, or stored in a database or retrieval system, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Adrienne Barthram.

Individual students and scholars are permitted to use material on the website for the purpose of personal study and scholarship provided that the foregoing strictures are not violated and the proper acknowledgements are given.

Copyright Blue Engine 2008 - 2014

Website design : www.blueengine.co.uk

Privacy policy | Terms and conditions
Home Introduction Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4
Conclusion Acknowledgements Bibliography